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Questions & Answers

 
Stephan
July 25th 2011
COMMENT Comments Off on Questions & Answers
Is my non-Goya Mast right for my 2010 Guru?

Question: I have a 2010 Goya Guru 4,7 since some weeks. I bought this sail, because you recommanded it for highwind windsurfing for lighter guys. I´m 73 Kg an so i thought it would be a good choice for me. Now I tested it in higher winds at the canaries an I was a bit unsatisfied. Compared with my North Ice 4,7 from 2009 it was less pressure stabil in a medium trimset (not trimmed it full power, because it was only 6 Beaoufort). Because it´s a reason of a wrong mastchoice!?? I used an 100% Carbon North Sails Skinny Mast in 400. What Masts are you recommanding. Please give me some advices more than only the Goya mast itself, because I would buy a second hand one! Thanks for your help.

Answer: Thanks for your mail and inquiry.

Let’s get you sorted out here…

The first and most common mistake for people coming from other
sail brands is that they don’t put enough downhaul. My sails
probably have the loosest heads of any sails on the market so
don’t be afraid to get plenty of downhaul on there. You should
downhaul the sail until the leech goes loose a full 2/3 of the way
in to the sail body between batten #1 and #2. It’s a lot. This is
a good setting for pretty much any condition.
Then you use the outhaul to control the power.
Start with about 3cm of positive outhaul (after the downhaul is
set), see how it feels, and reduce the outhaul for more power or
increase it to reduce power and create a more neutral feeling sail.
Also, make sure that all battens are properly tensioned until all
vertical wrinkles around the pocket are gone. The lower battens
require the most tension because they are longer and support more
profile, the upper battens require less because they are shorter
and flatter. This is an important step to make the sail feel crisp
and responsive.
Please try the techniques above and let me know how it goes…

A word about masts-

I don’t know the North mast bend spec exactly. Carbon content is
not as important as bend curve- the Goya 400 rdm is 64.5% bottom,
79% top, imcs about 18.5.

If your mast has a stiffer tip, then it can contribute to a less
stable feeling…

If you have further questions, please pair them with photos of
your sail rigged from different angles so that I can see what you
are working with. Having a visual reference really helps take the
conversation out of the realm of theory and in to practical
solutions.

Good luck Mike!

Let me know how you go…

Cheers!

Jason Diffin

**** UPDATE ON EXPERIENCE ****
Hi Jason, hi Francisco,
last weekend I could test the 4,7 Guru in reallly strong winds and great waves in Netherland. Your setting tipps were great. Now I love the sail. I put the downhaul like you said and I could control the sail even in heavy gusts between 7 to 8 Beoufort. Some other guys were already on 3,7! The handling was perfect and stays like in 5/6 Beaufort. With my 73 kg bodyweight now I have a perfect sail from beginning of 5 up to high 7 beaufort, a sail with a really wide windrange and a great handling, thats perfect! Great sails, good job boys!!! Thanks a lot for your help. I will recommand your sails to everybody I will meat!
Know I have to test your boards too maybe….
Thanks,
Mike

Nexus concept for a pure wave sail?

Question: Assuming you’re on Maui our worlds could not be further apart… today I have been skating the ocean ice with my kids to the closest islands, something we very seldom can do here. Very beautiful but it feels like it will be a long time until we carve bottom turns here again. Thank you for explaining your design concepts. I was aware of the size modifications of for example Guru and similar sails but I didn’t know how dramatic they were in Nexus. With the level of individuality of Nexus in mind, don’t you think it would be possible to expand the individuality even further and apply the same idea in a pure wave sail? I guess that is my original question. For Nexus you have identified three different applications and designed the appropriate size accordingly. If you would design for three applications for a wave sail I can see may advantages compared to selecting a line/suite/quiver (I don’t know the word) out of two or three different sail designs. An example of such a selection from Simmer would be BT5.4, BT4.8, iC4.2, MX3.7, MX3.3. Few sailors I know would dare to make that selection being concerned about different handling/feeling and required number of masts. This is where I see a potential for a new wave sail design, an elaborate design with a similar handling/feeling and as few mast lengths as possible. Such a design could perhaps replace a manufacturer’s need for two or even three different wave sails. A wave Nexus perhaps? Do you think it could be done? Which obvious disadvantages do you see? Why hasn’t anyone done this already?

Answer: The thing to remember here is that what you are proposing already exists.
It is a common strategy, and one I use myself, to choose key sizes from each model to suit your particular needs.
For example- I spend 4 months every summer sailing in The Gorge. I choose the control and easy feeling of the GURU up to 4.7, then go for the direct power ECLIPSE in sizes 5.0, 5.3, then from there I use NEXUS in sizes 5.9, 6.4 and +. This is my standard Gorge quiver, and it also works well when I go to the Oregon coast to wave sail (sizes 3.7 – 5.3).
The 5.3 ECLIPSE uses 400 mast, so that gives me basically 4.2 – 5.3 with one mast.
So what you are asking for is already available- You just have to choose what is right for you from the different models.

Here’s another point regarding why we have 10 sizes in one model-

Take GURU or ECLIPSE again, for example-
You have to keep in mind that I’m designing those sail ranges for people who weigh as little as 50kg and as much as 100kg.
The 50kg rider (and I have quite a few of them actually) may have 3.7 as their largest sail (GORGE), whereas the 100kg rider’s smallest sail is going to be a 5.0, and then they go up in size from there.
It’s an extreme example of weight variation, but regardless of the weight of the rider- they are all looking for the same thing from any particular model- power, speed, control, and durability. So, that’s why the “same” model is available in such a wide size range.

Any more comments, please let me know!

Keep warm…

Cheers

JD

How is Banzai positioned vis a vis Guru & Eclipse?

Question: The new 2012 looks stunning, simple and nice. Just needs a little help to position the Banzai in relation to Guru and Eclipse. In my mind I have Guru as very controleable high wind sail, easy to depower, fast. Not so good at early planning and cross on conditions Eclipse is power wave sail, with early planning and good with cross on conditions. A very attractive euro wave sail. Not so good at speed and controle in owerpowered conditions. So now to – where is Banzai better than Guru / Eclipse and where is it less recomended?

Answer: Thanks for your mail and inquiry.

I would tend to disagree regarding your comment about GURU-

Not so good at early planning and cross on conditions”
GURU is a quickly neutral sail, that’s for sure, but the sail also has a a good low end punch.
Also, I never really classify the sails according to conditions, but rather by the feeling and power delivery you are looking for in any given condition.
GURU works well in onshore conditions, if you like a quickly neutral, flexible feeling sail.
Alternatively, ECLIPSE is a great sail for cross offshore down the line wave riding if your preference is a quick and direct feeling sail.

Moving on to the new 4 batten sail BANZAI 2012-

Here’s my basic summary of the sail-

Currently the size range is 3.3, 3.6, 3.9, 4.3, 4.6, 4.9.
The spacing between sizes is larger than standard because the range of the sail is larger than standard.
That larger range inhabits the low end performance of the sail.
This 4 batten sail is meant to be used about .5 smaller than you would normally choose in models Guru and Eclipse. For example 4.9 replaces 5.3, 4.6 replaces 5.0, 4.3 replaces 4.5/(4.7).
***These sails are NOT meant to be used over powered. If it gets windier, you size down.
***These 4 batten sails are best paired with a modern, high volume board that gets moving quickly.
The profile of these sails is relatively flat, but very “engaged” from the bottom to the top. The entire sail is cut to generate lift everywhere. This is why it’s possible to use a smaller size. Also, the extreme light weight of the sail amplifies the lift. The super light weight plus relatively flat profile of the sail contributes to an effortless handling characteristic in maneuvers and just sailing along…

This 4 batten sail features an aspect ratio very similar to the 5 batten sails (the 4 batten 4.6 is 162/413), but considering that you use a size smaller than a 5 batten sail, you end up with the benefit of the shorter boom and luff comparatively.
I don’t believe that 4 batten sails should be too short in the luff dimension. If you shorten the height too much, then you are forced to extend the boom, the leech outline, or both. A square meter is a square meter after all, no matter how you draw it.
By minimizing the trailing outline of the sail the 4 batten maintains a very quiet feeling in the hands at all points of sail.

The power delivery of this sail is smooth and accelerating, and the feeling is a comfortable combination of direct and flexible.

Our 5 batten models GURU and ECLIPSE are a better choice for sailors looking for more high end range, and a lower locked and forward driving power delivery.
A couple of words regarding GURU and ECLIPSE-

ECLIPSE 2012 will still be a full power direct wave sail, but with a lighter, stronger construction, combined with a more forward driving, light feeling handling characteristic.

GURU 2012 also will be lighter and stronger. GURU 2012 will have great low end power and improved maneuverability in wave riding and transitions due to increased lower leech twist and a modified foot outline.

I hope this info helps Lars!
Please don’t hesitate to ask if you have any more questions…

Cheers

JD

Can 2012 4.9 Banzai replace my 5.7 Eclipse?

Question: Apparently the largest size available is a 4.9 Banzai and I was wondering if that be equal to a 5.7 Eclipse on a 95L Quatro Quad? I’d love to go as small a sail as possible, but not sure if the 4.9 will cut it for me. Even though I am 210lbs, I am an efficient sailor; often on the same sail size as lighter guys (say ~170-180lbs guys). The 5.7 2011 eclipse (monofilm version) I have now gets me going in mid teens (mph) winds. Too bad I didn’t get a change to try the sail last weekend, but I am sure you have a good idea if it will work for me or not. Also, would you think going all Banzai will work for me, or is the Eclipse Mono a more appropriate sail for me here in the Bay Area. Reading the 2012 brochure, it sounds like the 2012 sails are even lighter and more powerful than the 2011s??? Maybe do a 4.9 Banzai and then 5.0/4.5/4.0 Eclipse Mono?!

Answer: Basically with the Banzai sail- IF you have enough volume under your feet, then the Banzai power equals that of an Eclipse or Guru that is .5 meters larger. There is no way the Banzai 4.9 will replace the power of an Eclipse 5.7 for you.

But not to worry, the new Eclipse is a nice improvement over last year’s sail.
The construction is lighter, and the cut is a little different in that there is more lower leech release- this will help give the sails a lighter feeling, and an overall better better handling and high end speed.

The power level from 2011 to 2012 is not more, but is refined to create a lighter feeling better handling sail.

Regarding larger sizes Banzai- they are in the works, but at the moment I am only approving up to 4.9…
Stay tuned on that one, because as I work out those larger sizes, bigger guys like you will be top of the list for testing…!!!

Cheers Arnie!

JD

Ezzy Hookipa Skinny on 2011 Eclipse?

Questions: Hope all is well. I just received my 2011 Goya Eclipses-5.7 / 5.3 / 4.7 4.2 sooo stoked I currently have 2 masts, Ezzy Hookipa skinny, 1 is 430-21 and the other is 400-19 Just a few questions. Does the 5.3 Eclipse take 400-19 ? And can I get by with my Ezzy Hookipa skinnies? 2010 / 2009 models I guess I could sell the Ezzy-400-19 and buy a Goya 400-19, since the Goya 400- will cover me for 5.3 & 4.7 , but I saw in Boardseeker sail test that you recommended Ezzy as best alternative mast Most likely I will buy a Goya 370 /17 for 4.2 Mahalo for feedback / advice

Answer: Stoked to hear you got the new gear.

The 5.3 Eclipse requires a 400 mast.
Your Ezzy 400/19 should be OK!

The difference with the new Goya masts is that we have modified the lay-up of the masts to increase the durability, and the layup change also improved the feel of the masts.

Please feel free to contact me any time with feedback or questions John!

Happy Holidays

JD

Ezzy Masts for Fringe?

Question
Looking at a switch
Going from ezzy taka 5 to the fringe X
How well will my ezzy mast quiver work with the fringe
Second thing I having trouble finding a 3.7 blue
I wave sail and freeride foil in northern California.
Current quiver 3.8, 4.1, 4.5, 5.0, 5.3
Thanks

Jon

Answer
Aloha Jon,

Thank you for reaching over and for choosing our gear.

The Ezzy masts will work well with our sails, especially the older Ezzy masts made in the USA. The good thing about those is that you can interchange them, so you can try putting a shorter top with the longer bottom section. This will further alleviate the top of the sail, ideal for pure down-the-line wave sailing.

Still, if you have a chance, please try one of our new 80% or even 100% Goya Carbon masts. It will take your experience to the next level because of their lighter weights, reflex, and direct drive.

Please let us know if you have any other questions.

All the best winds,

Francisco & Team

How's the Banzai for Jumping? More just a riding sail or would it be good for jumping weather as well?

I definitely think that the 5 batten sails provide a more wing-like, “lifty” jumping experience. The 5 batten sails drive more forward in the air, and feel very stable.

But, the Banzai is so light that it is quick to respond to directional changes (looping) in jumps.

One more thing about the Banzai-
It’s not just for advanced riders.
I discovered in my last days of testing before I left for China that the sail is an excellent choice for lightweight sailors, particularly women- it is so light and easy to handle, and if the lady has a good floaty fast board, she can really enjoy the benefits of this super lightweight rig plus reduced sail size.

Sure the Banzai has a lot of monofilm (durability question), and it’s not the best if you’re totally overpowered, but other than those two things-

I actually think that the Banzai is a good choice for entry and mid level riders because of the lightweight and ease of use…

Cheers Guys!

JD

Should I change from Eclipse to Banzai?

Question: I use the 2011 Eclipse (5,3; 4,7; 4,2) and I am thinking about changing to the 2012 Banzai (4,9; 4,3; 3,9). Do you think that the Banzai makes sense in European conditions? I (69 kg) will use it on my lovely 72 quad and on my new freestyle 99 (it looks really great!). Thanks and greetz from Germany!you will love the BANZAI in sizes 4.9 and 4.3 for sure. The sails are so light and responsive and powerful. For really maxed out conditions where control is key, then it’s hard to beat the stability of a 5 batten sail. So, for your smallest size in the quiver you describe, I actually think a GURU 3.7 would be a great choice. That sail has great power, plus the pvc window and profile characteristic of the sail are very forgiving and comfortable in a huge wind range including over- powered conditions. GURU 2012 is lighter weight and lighter feeling, with a more effortless and responsive handling characteristic. If you don’t like the softer feeling of PVC, then ECLIPSE is the next choice. For 2012 Eclipse is also lighter weight and lighter feeling than previous versions. So, for the smallest size the choice is up to you. Personally I like the comfort and control of GURU in radical conditions, but if you like your sails more direct feeling, then go for ECLIPSE. 3.9 Banzai is still a pretty powerful sail, so my feeling is that as you move in to the high end wind range your focus should be on control, and that’s where the 5 batten 3.7 models come in to play. I hope this info helps you Heiko! Kind Regards, Jason Diffin

Answer: you will love the BANZAI in sizes 4.9 and 4.3 for sure. The
sails are so light and responsive and powerful.

For really maxed out conditions where control is key, then it’s hard
to beat the stability of a 5 batten sail.

So, for your smallest size in the quiver you describe, I actually
think a GURU 3.7 would be a great choice. That sail has great power,
plus the pvc window and profile characteristic of the sail are very
forgiving and comfortable in a huge wind range including over-
powered conditions.

GURU 2012 is lighter weight and lighter feeling, with a more
effortless and responsive handling characteristic.

If you don’t like the softer feeling of PVC, then ECLIPSE is the
next choice. For 2012 Eclipse is also lighter weight and lighter
feeling than previous versions.

So, for the smallest size the choice is up to you.

Personally I like the comfort and control of GURU in radical
conditions, but if you like your sails more direct feeling, then go
for ECLIPSE.

3.9 Banzai is still a pretty powerful sail, so my feeling is that as
you move in to the high end wind range your focus should be on
control, and that’s where the 5 batten 3.7 models come in to play.

I hope this info helps!

Kind Regards,
Jason Diffin

When will the Banzai be available?

4 batten sail should be available around the end summer.

What are the Specs on the Banzai?

The development of Banzai has really happened in tandem with the board development- the new style floaty, fast and loose boards really create a lot of opportunity to re-think the way the sail delivers it’s power and also how the sail can handle throughout a wide wind range.

Here are the specs for Banzai 2012-

– Jason D.

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